Relevancy of Book: Crisis in the Mideast

Relevancy of Crisis in the Mideast…

The novel Crisis in the Mideast describes a scenario where Iran blocks the Strait of Hormuz, thereby cutting off 20% of the world’s oil supply.

If Iran is unable to export oil, it could decide to retaliate by blocking the Strait of Hormuz: A tit for tat strategy.

This is an ever present danger under the current Iranian regime.

While merely fiction, the novel Crisis in the Mideast addresses many of the issues that would arise from such a move by Iran.

  • How can Iran block the Strait of Hormuz in the presence of a strong military force from the United States?
  • Can Iran’s nuclear facilities be shut down by military action without creating a nuclear event?
  • How will the United States reopen the Strait of Hormuz to restore oil shipments from the Gulf?
  • How does Iranian geography restrict military options by the United States?
  • Does Iran have additional strategic options?
  • How will Americans be affected? Gasoline rationing? Exports of US crude? Use of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve?

While hypothetical, each of these questions are addressed in the novel.

The crisis in the novel is precipitated by the sinking of a cruise ship with the deaths of hundreds of passengers, but world events today, with Iran’s aggressive terrorist and nuclear threats, could result in a tit for tat strategy by Iran.

Crisis from the Mideast is available from Amazon

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3 Replies to “Relevancy of Book: Crisis in the Mideast”

  1. I enjoyed your book very much. Among other things, I learned about the different ethnic groups in Saudi. (Like most Americans, I initially thought the whole country was Wahabi.)

    I think there are things about the Middle East that are best described in fiction. For example, I learned a lot about Israel and its neighbors in the book “The Collaborator of Bethlehem.” https://www.amazon.com/Collaborator-Bethlehem-Yussef-Mystery-Mysteries/dp/0618959653

    • Thanks for your comment. I agree. Fiction can impart a feeling for the culture and conditions of an area and the people who live there.

  2. Pingback: Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #359 | Watts Up With That?

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