Omaha Beach and Freedom

Omaha Beach and Freedom

It was my great privilege to visit Omaha Beach with a group from the Young America’s Foundation, on the 66th anniversary of D-Day. Standing on the cliff at Pointe du Hoc with shell holes, gun emplacements and pillboxes behind me, I could look over the precipice and marvel at how 225 Rangers scratched their way up the 180-foot cliff with grappling hooks and ropes while being shot at from above – and how, with incredible bravery, they achieved their objective.
Pointe du Hoc; Looking down to landing site
Pointe du Hoc; Looking down to landing site
Pointe du Hoc; Gun emplacement and shell holes.
Pointe du Hoc; Gun emplacement and shell holes.
Pointe du Hoc; Shell holes and destroyed concrete bunker.
Pointe du Hoc; Shell holes and destroyed concrete bunker.
On Omaha Beach, I walked to the water’s edge and looked back at the seawall that was several hundred feet from where I stood. To the right of the seawall was a concrete pill box that had an open view of the beach, and could rake the beach with machine gun fire. I stood at the water’s edge shortly after low tide, which is when the Americans landed. It took incredible bravery for men with packs weighing 120 pounds to run across those several hundred feet of beach to reach the partial cover afforded by the seawall.
Omaha Beach from waters edge at low tide; Gun emplacement is on right, in distance, alongside sea wall.
Omaha Beach from waters edge at low tide; Gun emplacement is on right, in distance, alongside sea wall.
Walking across the beach you come upon the gun emplacement that could sweep the beach with machine gun fire.  
Omaha Beach; Close up of gun emplacement with complete coverage of beach.
Omaha Beach; Close up of gun emplacement with complete coverage of beach.
Many did not survive and they are buried at the American Cemetery at Colleville sur Mer. At first sight of the perfectly aligned rows of marble crosses gazing over Omaha Beach, you are caught up short and take an extra breath to retain your composure. It is humbling to walk among those graves.  
Entrance to American cemetery at Colleville sur Mer
Entrance to American cemetery at Colleville sur Mer
And, just beyond the entrance the rows of white crosses.  
Partial view of American Cemetery
Partial view of American Cemetery
We live our lives in freedom because of the gift these men gave to us. Today, 75 years after D-Day, the great events of that day and World War II are slipping into the mist of history. Few alive today have a firsthand experience of World War II. Soon, D-Day will be a date-tagged name, like Belleau Wood, Gettysburg, and Valley Forge. Inexorably, D-Day and World War II will become irrelevant in the daily lives of each new generation. Hopefully, a message will transcend the murky mist of history, a message of freedom and why it must be protected and nurtured.

. . .

4 Replies to “Omaha Beach and Freedom”

  1. Hello Don it’s David Peggs here along with Aggie…. Fond memories of our trip and certainly of meeting you. You should be commended for your efforts in educating those that are willing to read your post regarding the truth behind the physics of energy, consumption, infrastructure etc keep up the great work you are one in a million.

    • David:
      Great to hear from you. I appreciate your comment. I also remember both you and Aggie on our cruise when I took these pictures.
      Many thanks, and hope you are both doing well.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.